Do What Comes Naturally

Claude Monet, Le Boulevard des Capucines Do What Comes Naturally

Have you ever looked at a great work of art and considered what you share in common with the artist? Or maybe, what you share in common with the engineer of the Egyptian pyramids? Well, you too have an intellect, a will, and possibly the capability of drawing straight lines. Either way, there are fundamental... [Read more...]

Begging Culture

Begging Culture

In this issue of Dominicana, we especially wanted to examine the role of the preacher within the city. There seemed no better interlocutor with whom to discuss this subject than Rémi Brague, a world-renowned philosopher and historian of ideas. He has taught in numerous universities in Europe and the... [Read more...]

Religion is Not Race

Religion is Not Race

There is a troubling tendency in our public discourse to reduce religion to race or ethnicity (the complex case of Judaism aside). On this view, religion is a more or less superficial feature of one’s identity—something akin to skin color or any other historical “accident.” Just as it would be... [Read more...]

The Standing Now

The Standing Now

In a few days we will celebrate Christ the King, which anticipates the moment when Jesus returns, time ends, and eternal life begins. But what do we mean by “eternal”? Is it the same sort of eternity as a traffic jam or a long line at the grocery store, when we notice every passing second? The easiest... [Read more...]

William Shakespeare, O.P.?

William Shakespeare, O.P.?

Shakespeare was a secret Catholic, more and more readers claim. Might he also have been a surreptitious Dominican—a tertiary like St. Catherine of Siena? An argument for Shakespeare’s connection with the Dominicans could, in a certain sense, actually be stronger than those for his personal affiliation... [Read more...]

Trouble in River City

Two men fighting over a pool table.a Trouble in River City

People thought about things differently in times long gone, and it can be very hard to pin down exactly what the differences are. They usually go unmentioned, and so unnoticed, in the background. Take something so simple as cause and effect. Classical or even medieval thought went one way. Following... [Read more...]

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