New Issue of Dominicana Journal Now Available!

Should Catholic parents homeschool their children? What does the president of the University of Virginia think about political correctness on campus? Is gentrification good, bad, or ugly? How should one minister to those who experience same-sex attraction?

The Winter 2015 edition of Dominicana Journal tackles these and more tough questions with careful arguments, clear thinking, and theological and philosophical insight uncommon in today’s unsavory media world. In addition to “hot topics,” this issue also has a reflection on the Holy Family, a translation of a work by Bl. Hyacinthe-Marie Cormier, O.P., an article on authenticity, and a take on the original Hillbilly Thomist, Flannery O’Connor. In the rest of the issue, you’ll find book reviews, original poetry, and beautiful images, all of which can aid in your life of study and contemplation.

Dominicana Journal is now in the mail and online. If you haven’t already subscribed, this unique publication is available here at an affordable price. With your subscription, you also gain access to our archives. Enjoy!

Image: Hiroshige, Shrines in Snowy Mountains

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Restorations It needed attention. Built in 1925, it was a neglected old cottage. The kitchen would require a good gutting and upgrade. The plumbing and electric were in a state of dangerous mutation. Having received only minor fixes and accretions over eighty years, these essential sources of domestic comfort were in a precarious place. We didn’t want galvanized pipes bursting into old knob & tube wiring, so we’d have to replace it all. The walls, ceiling...
The Gore of Grace “My preoccupations are technical. My preoccupation is how I am going to get this bull’s horns into this woman’s ribs.” -Flannery O’Connor, personal letter, 1956 The term salvation may conjure up the related words “grace,” “redemption,” “joy,” and the like. We may not immediately think “violence.” The popular image of The Good Shepherd depicts a smiling Christ looking off into a distant sunset while a perfectly groomed sheep rests contentedly o...
A Good Man Is Easy to Find Flannery O’Connor had an ear for the vacuous in popular wisdom. The saying “The devil you know is better than the devil you don’t” appears in two of her stories and, I suspect, particularly rankled her. But sometimes she also heard in the hollows of popular dicta the echo of real wisdom. In “Good Country People,” the saying “It takes all kinds to make the world” expresses not only the complacent relativism of Mrs. Hopewell but also a notion fo...
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The Editor

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Dominicana is published by the Dominican student brothers of the Province of Saint Joseph.