Aleks Dahlberg, Darkness The Lord’s Fear

Anxiety develops in three ways: the tidal waves of sudden tragedy, the rising flood of compounded stresses, and that heavy, salty air of ambient anxiety caused by constant tension or worry. Save me, O God, for the waters have risen to my neck. I have sunk into the mud of the deep and there is no foothold. I have entered the waters of the deep and the... [Read more...]

Fresh bread A Word for Bread

Editor’s note: This is the fourth post in a series commenting on the first words of Christ as presented in the Gospels. It is written,“One does not live by bread alone.” (Lk 4:4) With our modern dietary aversion to gluten and carbohydrates, bread has fallen on some hard times. The full weight of these first words of the adult Jesus from Luke’s... [Read more...]

Let It Linger

Perhaps it’s due to the oft-decried commercialization of Christmas, but it’s awful easy to just drift toward the big day itself, pushed and pulled by the currents of consumer culture until we wash up on the shore of December 26th, and haul down our trees and lights and head out to return that hideous orange sweater from Aunt Bertha. Perhaps a lame... [Read more...]

The Waters Have Risen to My Neck

“Do not babble like the pagans do Thinking many words louder than few.” But I can merely mumble one At the smashing news: I am heard in none. I met a woman this summer, poor and weary, working 60 hours a week as a maid and a phone-banker. She had put in the effort for a promised bonus, she told me, but when it came time for the paycheck, she was... [Read more...]

Othello and Desdemona Life’s Dramatic Irony

How poor are they that have not patience! What wound did ever heal but by degrees? — Iago, Othello Dramatic irony: that moment when, as a reader, you know more of the actual story than do the characters. It’s sometimes humorous, sometimes heart-wrenching, but always cringe-worthy. It’s a moment when you wish you could jump into the chambers and... [Read more...]

The First Comes Last

“The first in the order of intention is the last in the order of execution.” This philosophical principle, drilled into the minds of all aspiring Aristotelians, can seem at first to be quite discouraging. Simply put, it means that goals can only be achieved once intermediary steps have been completed. For example, if someone intends to run and finish... [Read more...]

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